Modern Chinese Literature

http://people.cohums.ohio-state.edu/denton2/courses/c503/c503.htm (look at PPs on literature)

Modern Chinese Literature Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, The Ohio State University, in conjunction with the journal Modern Chinese Literature and Culture.
http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dporter/sampler/sampler.html A chinese Text Sampler
  • Chinese Text Sampler: a collection of 50 carefully selected, culturally important Chinese texts intended for student reading practice.
David L. Porter
Associate Professor of English
and Comparative Literature
University of Michigan

http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dporter/sampler/sampler.html#ml Modern Chinese Literature

http://kimbofo.typepad.com/readingmatters/2010/10/a-chinese-reading-list.html Reading List

http://www.princeton.edu/~lynn/chinabib.pdf - Contemporary China - A book list by Lynn T. White III Professor of Politics and International Affairs
In subject matter, it is strikingly concerned with the contemporary: social problems, historical upheaval, changing ethical values, etc. In this sense, late Qing fiction is modern. Important novelists of the period include Wu Woyao (吴沃尧) (1866–1910), Li Boyuan (李伯元) (1867–1906), Liu E (刘鹗) (1857–1909), and Zeng Pu (曾朴) (1872–1935).
The literary scene in the first few years after the collapse of the Qing in 1911 was dominated by popular love stories, some written in the classical language and some in the vernacular. This entertainment fiction would later be labeled "Mandarin Ducks and Butterfly" fiction by New Culturalists, who despised its lack of social engagement. Lu Xun (1881–1936) is usually said to be the first major stylist in the new vernacular prose that Hu Shi and Chen Duxiu were promoting.
Mao Dun (茅盾) (1896–1981), the first of the novelists to emerge from the "League of Left-Wing Writers" and one whose work reflected the revolutionary struggle and disillusionment of the late 1920s; satirist and novelist Lao She (老舍) (1899–1966); and Ba Jin (巴金) (1904–2005), a novelist whose work was influenced by Ivan Turgenev and other Russian writers. In the 1930s Ba Jin produced a trilogy that depicted the struggle of modern youth against the ageold dominance of the Confucian family system. (The League of Left-Wing Writers founded in 1930 included Lu Xun (魯迅) among its leadersh In 1942, Mao Zedong gave a series of lectures called "Talks at the Yan'an Forum on Art and Literature" that clearly made literature subservient to politics via the Yan'an Rectification Movement. This document would become the national guideline for culture after the establishment of the People's Republic of China.Examples of this new socialist literature include The Builder ( Chuanye Shi 创业史) by Liu Qing 柳青, The Song of Youth (Qing Chun Zhi Ge 青春之歌) by Yang Mo 杨沫, Tracks in the Snowy Forest (Lin Hai Xue Yuan 林海雪原 ) by Qu Bo (novelist) 曲波, Keep the Red Flag Flying (Hong Qi Pu 红旗谱) by Liang Bin 梁斌, The Red Sun ( Hong Ri 红日) by Wu Qiang 吴强, and Red Crag ( Hong Yan 红岩) by Luo Guangbin 罗广斌 and Yang Yiyan (杨益言).wikipedia-chinese literature)
Mo, Yan. The Garlic Ballads. New York: Penguin, 1995. Red Sorghum
In rural China the government forces people to plant garlic, but selling the crop is not as simple as they had been led to believe. This book was banned in China as it shows an apocalyptic vision of life for the innumerable people of China who exist at the mercy of an uncaring state.
Mo, Yan. Red Sorghum: A Novel of China. New York: Penguin Books, 1994.
Su, Tung. Raise the Red Lantern: Three Novellas. New York: Penguin Books, 1996.
Raise the red lantern -- Nineteen thirty-four escapes -- Opium family.

Rickshaw Boy: A Novel [Paperback]

She Lao Blades of Grass: The Stories of Lao She
http://www.amazon.com/Blades-Grass-Stories-Fiction-Modern/dp/0824815068/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1303265386&sr=1-1

Hahn, Emily. The Soong Sisters. New York:

Han, Suyin. Eldest son : Zhou Enlai and the making of modern China, 1898-1976. London: Random House, 1994.

China and the Great War: China's Pursuit of a New National Identity and Internationalization (Studies in the Social and Cultural History of Modern Warfare) [Hardcover
Peony in Love
The Story of the Stone
Dream of the Red Chamber

The Cultural Revolution has spawned a literature all its own; three of the most insightful are Life and Death in Shanghai (Grafton, 1986) by Nien Cheng, Red Azalea by Anchee Min, and The Garlic Ballads (Viking, 1995) by Mo Yan.

Red Sorghum (Viking, 1993), by Mo Yan, is a powerful, searing novel about farm life during the Japanese Occupation, while Wild Swans (Simon and Schuster, 1995) by Jung Chang traces the changes and events of the 20th century in China through the lives of her grandmother, her mother, and herself.

http://www.yellowbridge.com/literature/modernfiction1900.php

Yan Fu (严复) (1864–1921) and Lin Shu (林纾) (1852–1924).

These writers generally tackled domestic issues, such as relations between the sexes, family, and friendship, but they were revolutionary in giving direct expression to female subjectivity. Ding Ling's (丁玲) story "Diary of Miss Sophie" (莎菲女士日记) exposes the thoughts and feelings of its female diarist in all their complexity.

In subject matter, it is strikingly concerned with the contemporary: social problems, historical upheaval, changing ethical values, etc. In this sense, late Qing fiction is modern. Important novelists of the period include Wu Woyao (吴沃尧) (1866–1910), Li Boyuan (李伯元) (1867–1906), Liu E (刘鹗) (1857–1909), and Zeng Pu (曾朴) (1872–1935). Lin Zexu

Republican era, Butterfly fiction would reach many more readers than its "progressive" counterpart.Lacked social engagement.

In terms of literary practice, Lu Xun (1881–1936) is usually said to be the first major stylist in the new vernacular prose that Hu Shi and Chen Duxiu were promoting.

Mao Dun (茅盾) (1896–1981), the first of the novelists to emerge from the "League of Left-Wing Writers" and one whose work reflected the revolutionary struggle and disillusionment of the late 1920s; satirist and novelist Lao She (老舍) (1899–1966); and Ba Jin (巴金) (1904–2005), a novelist whose work was influenced by Ivan Turgenev and other Russian writers. In the 1930s Ba Jin produced a trilogy that depicted the struggle of modern youth against the ageold dominance of the Confucian family system. Comparison often is made[by whom?] between Jia (Family), one of the novels in the trilogy, and Dream of the Red Chamber (红楼梦).

In 1942, Mao Zedong gave a series of lectures called "Talks at the Yan'an Forum on Art and Literature" that clearly made literature subservient to politics via the Yan'an Rectification Movement. This document would become the national guideline for culture after the establishment of the People's Republic of China.

http://www.china-on-site.com/literatu/intro.htm
During the first half of the 20th century Chinese writers used literature as a mirror to reflect the seamy side of life, as a weapon to combat the evils of society, and as a form of propaganda to spread the message of class struggle. By using trenchant essays and stories to attack traditional society, writers such as Lu Xun, whose real name was Zhou Shuren, helped advance the socialist revolution. Although the spirit of Chinese literature changed, the background, characters, and events depicted remained typically Chinese.

http://www.travelchinaguide.com/intro/literature1.htm#1
Lu Xun, the harbinger and master of modern literature, composed the Madman's Diary, which is the first work set completely in exoteric language and which sharply revealed the essence of society. The True Story of Ah Q is considered to his finest novel and built up the image of spiritual anesthesia in both Chinese and world literature.
Lao She was skillful in utilizing the Peking dialect and Camel Xiangzi and the drama Tea House are his masterpieces which reflect the helplessness of the lower classes in the old China.
Bing Xin, a literary woman, is known for her morbidezza style of writing, so called as she wrote as though painting a picture with the finest and most tender detail. From her works you can get an insight of mother love and innocence.
Lin Yutang wrote many essays. After settling in America, he created the novel Moment in Peking, and won the nomination for the Nobel Prize for Literature.